July 21, 2014
vintageblackglamour:

Josephine Premice (1926-2001), the splendid Tony-nominated actress, singer and dancer was born 88 years ago today in Brooklyn, New York. Diahann Carroll, her best friend for more than four decades, called the Haitian-American aesthete “a naturally elegant woman who had exquisite taste in everything in life” and credited her with her fashion advice that she still uses. Ms. Premice was also the mother of novelist and television producer (“A Different World”) Susan Fales-Hill who wrote a fantastic memoir about her mother called “Always Wear Joy.” In this photo, Ms. Premice is seen tying the ribbon on her high-heeled shoes just before a performance in May 1951. Photo: Kurt Hutton/Stringer/Getty Images.

vintageblackglamour:

Josephine Premice (1926-2001), the splendid Tony-nominated actress, singer and dancer was born 88 years ago today in Brooklyn, New York. Diahann Carroll, her best friend for more than four decades, called the Haitian-American aesthete “a naturally elegant woman who had exquisite taste in everything in life” and credited her with her fashion advice that she still uses. Ms. Premice was also the mother of novelist and television producer (“A Different World”) Susan Fales-Hill who wrote a fantastic memoir about her mother called “Always Wear Joy.” In this photo, Ms. Premice is seen tying the ribbon on her high-heeled shoes just before a performance in May 1951. Photo: Kurt Hutton/Stringer/Getty Images.

July 21, 2014
Me and Boyfriend on a Regular

July 20, 2014

I will regain control. 

July 16, 2014

(Source: wolfbrotherhood, via pretty-problematic)

July 11, 2014

beam-meh-up-scotty:

ladyanastaciaspencer:

Harlem Nights 1989

An absolutely great film.

(via itsmerandi)

July 10, 2014

(Source: browngurl, via harlemsnaturalesq)

July 10, 2014

vanityvanquished:

wussut:

lovelyandbrown:

dynamicafrica:

(NSFW) Black Athletes in the ESPN’s 2014 Body Issue.

  • Serge Ibaka (Basketball)
  • Venus Williams (Tennis)
  • Aja Evans (Bobsleigh)
  • Nigel Sylvester (BMX)
  • Marshawn Lynch (American Football)
  • Prince Fielder (Baseball)
  • Larry Fitzgerald (American Football)
  • Bernard Hopkins (Boxing)

(more photos)

Yesssssss

This is dope as hell man

I can’t even front on these beautiful ass people.

In every one of these, I was like “Damn, those are some beautiful legs.” 

(via harlemsnaturalesq)

July 9, 2014

wezanderson:

City Of God: 10 Years Later (x)

(via harlemsnaturalesq)

July 9, 2014

Yaus!

(via harlemsnaturalesq)

July 8, 2014

exgynocraticgrrl:

[Gifset text reads:

"There’s a very good sentence written by a black woman named Kay Lindsey in which she said, ‘Where the white woman is the sexual object, black women are sexual laborers.’

White womanhood has been the prevailing standard of femininity in this country [the United States of America]. If you were beautiful you had pale skin,…you had light skin, preferably light hair, you were gentle, you were retiring, you were sweet, you were chaste.

Because of our historical position as black women, most of us were slaves which means we worked as hard as any man on the plantations, then we moved into factories. Most of us were not pure because on plantations we were bought to be breeders and whores. We were not qualified for the prevailing standards of femininity, white femininity, so we were passed down.

If you are a woman who does not fit women’s standards, you’re a piece of crap. So we [black women] got none of the benefits of being a woman. They’re double-edged benefits but they are benefits: money from wealthy men, so-on and so-forth. We [black women] got all of the liabilities. As I said before, we are on the lowest rung, even in a profession like prostitution because we are valueless as black women.

So we [black women] were brought up outside the pale of femininity but we weren’t considered worth turning into useful men; because ‘What is a Black Woman?’ She’s a woman and she is also black. We weren’t as good as black men and we were useless, we weren’t good enough to be imitating white women. So we had nothing.

[Black women] were total outsiders. Which is why economically we are on the absolute bottom and psychologically, if you will, of the barrel.”]

Margo Jefferson on Some American Feminists (1980)

(via pretty-problematic)

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